Chasing Financial Freedom

Ep 280 | A Blueprint for Transformational Leadership with Nico Morales

May 15, 2024 Ryan DeMent Episode 280
Ep 280 | A Blueprint for Transformational Leadership with Nico Morales
Chasing Financial Freedom
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Chasing Financial Freedom
Ep 280 | A Blueprint for Transformational Leadership with Nico Morales
May 15, 2024 Episode 280
Ryan DeMent

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Discover the remarkable transformation of Nico Morales, a man who has traveled from the depths of addiction to the peaks of authorship and motivational speaking. Join us as Nico shares his powerful journey, offering a raw and honest look at the struggles he overcame to become the beacon of hope he is today. His philosophy, "Don't be perfect, do better," isn't just a mantra—it's a battle cry for anyone yearning to turn their life around, echoed throughout our conversation.

Embark on deeply exploring the mind's potential to reshape reality and find success, even amid adversity. We examine Tony Robbins' analogy of seeking colors and how it relates to our pursuit of opportunities over excuses. Through candid discussions about critical thinking, social media's impact, and the need for authentic leadership, we uncover the generational shifts in work ethic and the power of mentorship. Our dialogue with Nico inspires and offers practical wisdom for harnessing one's inherent abilities to foster personal growth and community improvement.

Lastly, the pursuit of consistency in podcasting unfolds as a testament to dedication—revealing the myths and realities behind the journey of "Chasing Financial Freedom." Sharing my experiences, I highlight the discipline required never to miss an episode release and the resilience needed to maintain momentum. The episode invites us to harness the strength inherent in our most challenging struggles. For listeners seeking a transformative experience, this episode promises to guide the quest for financial and personal emancipation.

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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Send us a Text Message.

Discover the remarkable transformation of Nico Morales, a man who has traveled from the depths of addiction to the peaks of authorship and motivational speaking. Join us as Nico shares his powerful journey, offering a raw and honest look at the struggles he overcame to become the beacon of hope he is today. His philosophy, "Don't be perfect, do better," isn't just a mantra—it's a battle cry for anyone yearning to turn their life around, echoed throughout our conversation.

Embark on deeply exploring the mind's potential to reshape reality and find success, even amid adversity. We examine Tony Robbins' analogy of seeking colors and how it relates to our pursuit of opportunities over excuses. Through candid discussions about critical thinking, social media's impact, and the need for authentic leadership, we uncover the generational shifts in work ethic and the power of mentorship. Our dialogue with Nico inspires and offers practical wisdom for harnessing one's inherent abilities to foster personal growth and community improvement.

Lastly, the pursuit of consistency in podcasting unfolds as a testament to dedication—revealing the myths and realities behind the journey of "Chasing Financial Freedom." Sharing my experiences, I highlight the discipline required never to miss an episode release and the resilience needed to maintain momentum. The episode invites us to harness the strength inherent in our most challenging struggles. For listeners seeking a transformative experience, this episode promises to guide the quest for financial and personal emancipation.

Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched!
Start for FREE

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Support the Show.

Thanks for Listening! Follow us on Tik Tok Facebook and Instagram

Speaker 1:

Hey guys, ryan DeMent from Chasing Financial Freedom podcast. Hope you guys are having a great day. Today on the podcast we have Nico Morales and we met up on Podmatch, but I love what he has for his slogan, or saying don't be perfect, do better. Today, nico, welcome to the show.

Speaker 2:

Hey, ryan, thanks for having me, man. I appreciate you opening up your platform.

Speaker 1:

You're more than welcome. Before we get into what you're doing, can you give the listeners a little bit some background?

Speaker 2:

of who you are and what you've got going on. Oh yeah, absolutely Quick quibbles about who I am Athlete turned into addict, turned into author. Some people I've been called a goon and I turned that into a graduate. Really, what I am, man, is a young man that came up from the Southwest in a lower middle class family who idolized money and idolized, admired the things that came along with money. The only people that I saw that had money were drug dealers. So why not pursue that as a goal? And that's what I pursued to do. Unfortunately, I broke one of the rules of that game, and that was get high on your own supply.

Speaker 2:

I grew up in early. 2000s was my teenage years, 2010s was my 20s. The opiate epidemic the first wave of it, I should say, is the one that I got caught up in when pills were just everything and everywhere man. They solved problems for me, and I don't say that to encourage anybody to use drugs or alcohol, but one of the things that I think a lot of people don't recognize is that substances are a solution to a symptom that people feel. After I kicked my heroin addiction, I started drinking, which is a legal drug, and the only reason why it's legal is because the government gets a tax off of it, and repeated the cycle of addiction. Right there I found myself in the same scenario that I was previously, with just a different substance. So I knew that there was something wrong internally. There was something that I was doing, there was something that I hadn't solved and I started pursuing that.

Speaker 2:

I learned about the professional development arena and industry and probably late 2017, 2016, just on my, their kids, and then somebody who has a ton of money. We lived in one of the most wealthiest countries in the world. Why shouldn't we all be wealthy? Is one of my theories, and I've never seen a man that has all three. So in my pursuit to find, or find, somebody that can give me that blueprint, I came across a man named Eric Thomas.

Speaker 2:

Et the Hip Hop Preacher is what he goes by and I started just studying his curriculum, his material, his podcast, and it's what really helped shift my paradigm around both lifestyle what wealth actually is and money habits. So from there I kept on digging in. That was, like I said, late 2017. Since then, I've been on this pursuit of building skill sets that can generate whatever type of currency is going to be used in whatever type of environment I'm going to be in, and that's what I'm about now is helping individuals create and cultivate those skill sets, because we all have natural abilities. We all have natural skills. Why not use them to benefit not just yourself, but your community and your family?

Speaker 1:

So you're coaching today as we speak.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I coach today, I facilitate corporate trainings today week. Yeah, I coach today, I facilitate corporate trainings today, and I think that's it.

Speaker 1:

I do keynotes too today as we speak. Okay, so, with all that said, you've had some ups and downs in life. I'm with you. We all have them. How did finding ET really change your life? What did that do? I want to start there and then start digging in under the hood to understand how people can really pull themselves out of that deep, dark place and find that passion that they have inside, that they're wired for by the creator, god. However, people want to talk about it to make a difference in this world, absolutely.

Speaker 2:

When I first heard ET talk about the paradigm, it made sense to me, because most of the programs that are out there and available for individuals that come from the background that I come from, I'll tell you that you are worthless, that you have no power and that you are powerless, and that don't make no sense to me. That don't make no sense to me. It doesn't make any sense to me how I can be the highest form of creation on this planet, but I'm powerless. So I understand that there is a higher power than me, but if there's a higher power than me that's outside of this world, then that makes me the most powerful thing inside this world. And the way that you think about things is one of his key topics. Right, when you want to succeed, you want to breathe. There's this key note that he just blew up on. But that's a thought process, that's a thinking pattern that you have to create, that you have to cultivate, and that's what's made it snap inside of my head. Is that what I was thinking about?

Speaker 2:

My adversities as a child coming up in lower middle class America? Yes, I had two parents. Yes, I got the opportunity to travel. Yes, I got the opportunity to engage in cultural experiences, but other things that happened in my life. They made me feel less than things that happened in my life. They made me feel less than, and so when I thought about it as that victim mindset, instead of no, I survived all that stuff. I made it through.

Speaker 2:

All this stuff that gave me power, and by that, having that internal power, that validating myself through my own self-talk and changing my self-talk is what really made it click inside of my head that these things didn't happen to me. These things happened for me and because I survived it, I'm able to share that knowledge with other individuals. And today we live in the day and age of information, right? These podcasts that we're doing are going to be the books that are out there. People don't like to sit down and read books. So if I can take my life, script it in a way that is palatable to the general population and teach quibbets little quick notes that they can use on their own, that's the best thing that I could do for my community.

Speaker 1:

So how do we start with that mindset and that talk that's in our head to get us out of where we're at? Because I'll back up Today's day and age you talked about. We're in the age of information, but we're also in the age of instant gratification. People think you're going to put a video out, you're going to go viral and you're going to be a billionaire overnight, and they don't realize the time and effort that goes into this. And a good example is this podcast is now turning six years old. I've put 260 or 70 episodes down. I'm just this last year and a half of starting getting traction to where I'm down. I'm getting a thousand, 15, 2000 downloads an episode before, 25, 50, a hundred, maybe 300. If I would have given up wouldn't have saw the other side of it. But this is just a passion of mine and I don't think we know how to connect passion into end results. When I say end result is what are you trying to do with it? Because we're only worried about the one thing you spoke about earlier is the money.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. So the first thing that we have to do is we have to identify the lies that we're telling ourselves. So what is that lie that we're telling ourselves? Let's use that exact same example the instant gratification I'm going to blow up after one video. Yeah, maybe if you go dye your hair blue, eat a stick of glue and dance around with some cat ears like, oh, you might get 10,000 views your first video Awesome. But what kind of value did that bring into our community? So what are the lies that we are telling ourselves? That's the first thing.

Speaker 2:

One of the lies that I told myself was that, oh, I'm from New Mexico and New Mexico is poor and New Mexico is high in violence and there's nothing that comes good. We don't have opportunities. I had to stop that. I had to stop telling myself that type of lie. What I had to switch that same scenario up with is that you know what You're right. New Mexico doesn't have high levels of education. So if I create myself a path to education, I can show others and that'll help out my community. So it's not that it's not accessible. It's that we just don't take advantage of what is accessible to us. Second one it's high violence, absolutely In 2023,. They just came out with the most violent cities in America. Guess where Albuquerque ranks? That's where I'm born and raised. We're in the top five. Yeah, violence is huge, but guess what, nico? You made it 35 years through this city at doing stupid things like participating in actions that you shouldn't have participated in. That just should highlight that you were built here to do something immaculate, something incredible. So it's just switching those lies that we're telling ourselves and nothing comes good out of New Mexico. I can tell you so many things. Jeff Bezos comes from New Mexico right, that's one Exhibit, if you like, rapping comes from New Mexico. Born and raised I'm talking. Billy the Kid calling back in history comes from New Mexico. One of the only reasons why the North won the war over the South was because of the Battle of Glorieta, which happened here in New Mexico. So there are some amazing things that have come out of New Mexico when you actually switch what you're looking for.

Speaker 2:

I think Tony Robbins is another guy that speaks in a way that makes a lot of sense to me, and one of the things he says is wherever you're at right now, if you just start to choose to look for something that's red, you're going to find things that are red. If you start looking for things that are green, then you're going to find things that are green, and that's how you start to change the way that you think. What are you searching to find? And for me, I was searching to find excuses. I was searching to find reasons that I was lacking, and so I found all of those. When I switched that and I started to search for opportunities and obstacles that I had overcome that I can leverage to my benefit, then I started to find those as well.

Speaker 2:

So really, it begins with what's going on between our ears and the majority of individuals with the saturation that we have of social media, the saturation that we have with instant access to information. Yes, technology is great, but access to a cell phone isn't always that good, because then you don't know how to formulate your own thoughts, you don't know how to have critical thinking. I can get on here and say some BS that sounds nice, and if you don't actually challenge it against your own morals and your own values, then guess what? You're just playing along with what I decided to spew that day, and that's where we're seeing a lot of the influencers die off because they can say it, but do they actually live it Right? And one of the things that I love about ET himself is that he's a man of his word. He lives what he talks about, and in today's society that's very difficult to find. One of my other mentors that I love to death is Wes Watson, and that man lives his life exactly how he speaks. He's on the complete opposite end of ET right. Et is a pastor, come up in the church and started working that way. Wes Watson teaches the exact same thing and he learned it in the California penitentiary. So for me, when I see polar opposites speaking the exact same truth, I know that it's truth and being able to articulate it in a way that can be communicated to individuals who maybe don't relate with either one of those, but they can relate with Nico.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, I did have a problem with drinking. Oh yeah, I did. Yeah, I remember what it's like in the early epidemics of 2000s. My generation is a generation that I know what it's like to call someone's house. I had to speak to their father before I ask the girl, before I ask to talk to the girl. I know what it's like to talk to a landline. I know what a rotary phone looks like. My generation. They call it the Oregon Trail of the digital world because we get to explore it. And it's a fine balance that I get to stand on both lines, because I know that when I meet another man inside of a room, physically I stand up and I look him in the eyes and I shake his hand.

Speaker 2:

Today's society kids aren't taught that and so that is a opportunity. Right, that's the way that I think about it, instead of saying kids these days don't know how to act, no, they just haven't been taught, because they're learning everything from the internet and they think that immediate gratification and not blowing up in a matter of 10 minutes after you post the video is a failure. They don't understand what actual failure is. They don't know what it's like to be dead broke, have your bank account overdraft and people still needed to collect their bills. They don't know what it's like to have the car break down and catch the bus because they don't have a cell phone to call anybody. They don't know what that's like, and when I compare that to the generations before me, they're like Nico, that you even have a bus is great. You know what I'm saying. So we are building on top of each other.

Speaker 2:

But that thought process is what really captivated me by ETT's teaching, because even if we go into history further as I started doing this, personal development studies he teaches the exact same thing that Epictetus taught back in Greece, that Marcus Aurelius was teaching. You can even take it back to what Jesus was teaching. Prior to Jesus there was other people, so they're teaching the exact same things. Now, don't get me wrong. I'm not comparing Marcus Aurelius and Jesus or all my religious folks out there. I know there's a difference. I get you, we can have that conversation. But the fundamental thing of thinking is what makes it so crucial. Then you learn from the Godfather, napoleon Hill himself.

Speaker 2:

That's what he talks about Like you think and you grow rich. It's not. You hope and wish you actually got to put in the work, but you got to think about the work that you're doing.

Speaker 1:

It's put in the work. Think about it. But can we go back to these? You're talking about kids not being taught. Do you think they want to be taught? And I'm not. I'm not trying to pick a side or anything. I'm just trying to have a healthy conversation because I have nephews that have the same problem and they see what I'm doing.

Speaker 1:

But that sign that's right below me is very indicative of my life as an entrepreneur. No one sees all the junk that's below the waterline that you have to go through. And, believe me, I've had lots of failures. I've had a lot of mental anguish, but if you ask me if I would do it all over again, the joke is prior to this, I spent 25 plus years in corporate America running billion dollar companies. I was running call centers, collection agencies, any type of financial instrument. I touched and managed it.

Speaker 1:

And my mom still asks me, after almost 10 years of doing this, of would you go back? Not a day goes by that I would even think about going back, just for the simple fact of I get to create my own destiny. I get to learn so much. But the other thing that I told her yesterday on Mother's Day, was I've learned so much in the perseverance, but also being consistent in what I'm trying to do. And that starts up here and, believe me, it sucks on every day. That ends in Y, because there's always something I'm anxious about.

Speaker 1:

Because I'm an entrepreneur, I worry about the future and the only way I know how to describe it is get grounded in what helps you get there. Me, it's a daily devotional. I actually am a lot older than you. I write things down on a piece of paper with a pencil or a pen. I journal, I read verses in the Bible. People think that's crazy, but you know what? There's a lot of things that are in that Bible that were said thousands of years ago, that are really tied into today's society's issues that we all can learn from. You just have to have an open mind and say I'm willing to change.

Speaker 2:

Oh man, you dropped so much there. I want to touch on all of it, but the question that you had asked me at the beginning was do I believe that they want to learn? Yes, in my heart, I believe that they want to learn Because there is something about it. When I walk into a room of young adults and they can just sense it, they can sense that there's something different when I enter the room and that sense is what they are. They have no exposure to it so that when they come around it, it freaks them out at first, but it's like that adrenaline freak out. Yeah, it's a little bit scary, but I know this is right. That adrenaline freak out, yeah, it's a little bit scary, but I know this is right. So when they don't look me in the eye and I tell them stand up, when you shake my hand, or I'm not shaking your hand, they understand that there's something to that. Right, there's something to it. So I, in my heart, believe that, yes, they do. They do want to know what it's like.

Speaker 2:

There's a young man that I've been mentoring for the past 10 years and he has special needs, right. So he doesn't think with all, he doesn't have all the full capabilities in his mind. Physically he's able, but mentally he just has some gaps. And even with him there's a certain way that I conduct myself that when he's with me he knows to conduct himself the same way. My good friend he just had a son on the godfather. He's maybe about three or four years old and when we me and my homie go out to eat with his son, he acts differently than when he's with his mom. He knows there's a certain conduct that you got to have when you're walking around men and so, yes, I truly believe that they are seeking for it.

Speaker 2:

Now, where are they going to find it? That's where the gap needs to be built, and what I've learned is that we have to give them what they want in order to teach them. What they want is to see people with those flashy watches. They want to see people with the big chains. They want to see people who have the nice cars, who have the nice mansions, who have the beautiful wives. They want to see that because that's what they want. But then we need to teach them the consistency that brings that about right. We need to teach them that it's not about short-term rentals and leasing a car. It's about learning how to create generational wealth by getting titles and deeds and learning how to put those underneath. Llcs and creating EINs, creating trusts, creating manager accounts so that you can put all your assets in one account, manage account with another, so when things go crap, you're still protected. We need to teach them that and that's our duty as the generation that is going to be passing the torch.

Speaker 2:

So that's where I find the obstacles, because many of the people that I'm around who are older than me, they're like Nico, you don't need to be buying anything that's nice, you don't need to get a Mercedes. Nico, I'm like I actually do. I need to purchase a Mercedes. That young man who's out there who's thinking about selling fentanyl tomorrow to pay his bills will look at me and be like what do you do? And I could teach him.

Speaker 2:

You know what? I teach people how to live a better life, and I don't even pay for this car. I rent this car out on Turo and I drive an 03 Chevy Apollo most of the month. That's the gap that I think that we need to fill. A long answer to your question, but I do want to just touch on that other thing. Is that the habits that you just described I share as well. Even this morning, I was doing my devotion, I was doing my reading, I was spending time with God, and I've read the Bible front and back a couple of different times. I get the opportunity to teach on the Bible every once in a while. I have pastors ask me to go in and speak for them while they're on their breaks and it speaks to you.

Speaker 2:

So I was reading something that I had. I read some texts that I've read before, but it stood out to me in a different way this morning. So, absolutely, those type of habits are missing. And writing if you can't write out your thoughts, communication for me, one of the reasons why I love it, why I need to be articulate, why I don't speak with my volcano accent no more and tell the homies what's up, man. I don't speak with my volcano accent no more and tell the homies what's up, man.

Speaker 2:

I don't speak like that is because I need to reach out to a mass of people, and in order to reach that mass of people, I have to speak in an articulate way that can communicate thoughts both to laymen and very educated individuals, because it's the same truths.

Speaker 2:

So if I have to say it in multi-syllabic words and write a thesis about it, great I can do that. But if I also need to just sit down and chop it up with the homie and be like here here's what it is, I know how to do that as well, and writing helps you do that right. Writing helps you do that, reading helps you do that, and the more that you can use these type of habits that are becoming scarce, the more of a rare individual you become. I think it's the law of compensation that says the ability to do it, the need for it to be done and the opportunity for you to be replaced. So if we are creating these habits like you just described, then the opportunity for us to be replaced dwindles little by little. You said you've been at it for six years, right. For somebody else who's been at it for just a year, the opportunity for them to be replaced is far greater than it is for you.

Speaker 1:

With podcasts. They talk about the magic number 100 episodes, and for me do. I believe it Somewhat, but I'm not sure, because ultimately I took a screenshot of iTunes when I started this podcast and my other podcast and I went back every year to take a look at the active podcasts If those same podcasts when I started were there. They're not. There was 22 that started on the day, 21 that started on the day, something like that. There's only three of us left that are actually active in producing. Have I figured out how to monetize this yet? It's been, it's always been on my mind, but it's not top of mind. I truly am putting out there and this is again we can talk about this and go through that is I've been putting out there that I need to find a producer that's willing to work with me, because I don't have a huge budget, I don't have thousands of dollars to throw at a producer that could help me grow this. I'm willing to share in the revenue and go through that, but that's my next step is I need to find a producer that can help me take it to the next level, because today it's just myself and a VA that we do all the post-production stuff. We put it out there, do all the shorts, connect all the guests. We have automation. But I think there's people that are a lot better at this than I am that could change it.

Speaker 1:

But that's just being patient, persistent and consistent every single week. I never miss. Episode goes out every Wednesday. Just don't miss, I don't miss. And if I'm sick, I find a way to get something out to make sure that people understand that, hey, something happened. But that's life and making sure that you have it up here so you can get it out there. I think it's Bob Proctor that says if you can envision it in here, you'll have it here in your hand. Or maybe it's backwards, I can't remember, but that's big. If you can envision it and you're positive, up here you're, you can always get it there. It's just not going to happen instantaneous. But if you have a scarcity mindset and you think of all these bad things that are happening, guess what, like you said, you sought out those things, you thought of them and they all came to you. So why not use it for positivity, to better yourself, to help others, to get them in a better place?

Speaker 2:

in their lives also. Absolutely, you have that right. Bob Proctor did say you have to see it in your mind first before you can hold it in your hand I was listening to.

Speaker 2:

I think his name is Andy Frisella. I saw one of his shorts and he's the owner of a bunch of different. He's coming up pretty hefty right now in the personal development game. But he talked about exactly what you just said. He said you got to just keep on doing it. If a hundred people start year one by year three, 80 of them already fell off by year six. 17 more just fell off by year nine and 12, there's only three that actually started. And you had mentioned working in call centers or work with call centers earlier. I used to work in a call center. That's how I paid to get my education right. I wasn't going to pay for it. I don't know, baki, I don't personally. I'm a hustler Like I need. If someone else could, I could use other people's money. I'm going to use other people's money. That's just how it goes. And so the call center that I worked at gave that opportunity. But even there, I worked at that call center for eight years.

Speaker 2:

And there was maybe 50 people that started in class with me. By the time that I left I was one of two, three that were still there.

Speaker 1:

It's an overrate for sure.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and even now I took a class from ET et. I was in one of his speaking classes. This was about three years ago and everybody's all gung-ho and think they're gonna blow up just because et puts people on. No, he does it. He wants to see how consistent you are. I'll get me wrong. I've been blessed to get to know him. I've been blessed to get to know his team pretty well, where they know me by my first name, but ain't't nobody's going to be like oh yeah, nico's the next one up, let's just go ahead and put his name out there. You got to do your work and so even with us, there's only maybe about two of us that are still actually in this speaking game, constantly doing keynotes and facilitations, and a lot of people don't want to do that rejection. Work, man.

Speaker 2:

For the first like year and a half that I started speaking, I pay for my own salary out of my savings, just so I can stay afloat, and I got told no. Each and every freaking day I send out 100 emails a week and out of those 100 emails I got 100 no's. And I get it. There's a defeating mindset that can kick in there. What am I doing? And again it comes back to. Are you thinking about the hustle? Are you thinking about the grind? Are you thinking about the failure? Are you thinking about the patience and the discipline that you're creating during that timeframe? Or are you just thinking, oh, it's not for me, I'm not gonna do it, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. No, bro, and because of that, I've been able to meet individuals. So now when I travel, it's just oh, nico, you're here again. Yeah, hell, yeah, what's up? I'm here again. I still need to learn and you get credibility by doing that, because a lot of it is just staying consistent People.

Speaker 2:

Right now, I've seen in a society a huge uptick in health influencers and it's cute, it's cool, but one of the things you can't buy is a body, and I think that's where that's why it makes it so admirable right now. I don't get me wrong there's some guys who start off with just a nice physique and then they hop online and they do it. But watch somebody I used to weigh 260 pounds when I was over drinking. Right, I cut down to 170 pounds and then I started rebuilding my body mass up, so now I sit about 200 pounds. I can show proof of that whole journey, right, and that, for me, makes me more proud than the physique that I have right now, is that look, this is how bad I was, this is how good I got and this is where I'm at on the journey, and so I think that whole consistency and staying committed to your own word is what's really important.

Speaker 1:

And it starts with goals, and I think that's a whole nother thing we could go into that we could talk about hours on is, if you don't have goals and you don't write them down, you try to. You're consistently trying to accomplish something. You're just chasing your tail. And taking it one step further is have those high level goals but then break them down in baby steps that you can actually start accomplishing to get where you need to go. Otherwise, you get overwhelmed.

Speaker 1:

I know I did, I still do, and this morning I wrote down some goals that I'm trying to accomplish this week and I'm like how the heck am I going to accomplish those? And I've got to really break them down, cause one of the things I'm really focusing on is getting out of the business and getting on the business and working on it, and one of those things is the outsourcing of our marketing and our sales, and AI is perfect for that. So I've been training an AI outbound caller for probably about six weeks and we're close. She literally sounds real, but I'm not trying to have her sound real, but I want her to have a conversation. Her name's Alexa, not Alexa. I called her Sarah was Alexa initially, but now her name is Sarah, but I want her to have a conversation with somebody because it's a reflection of our business and who we are.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely Did we lose you. And uh, I'm still here. I just had to take a breather because goals are great. I truly believe that you should have goals. What I've learned in my journey is that the goal is not as important as the habits to build that goal. So when you said that you have to break it down into smaller chunks, absolutely Recently I just finished a book called who, not how, I've read it, good book.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, great book, and it talks about you need to become the person that can achieve that goal. It's not so much about what are you doing as what or who are you becoming. So exactly what you just said you're becoming innovative with your strategy. I can't pay thousands of dollars out to a marketing team. What do I have options for? What do I have access to? I got access to AI and I do have the option to train it, so why not use it? But people don't want to do that, right? If I can't pay somebody to do it, then why should I even do it?

Speaker 1:

It's being resourceful and I really liked that in that book, and it's been a while since I read it. Correct me if I'm wrong. They talk about an impact filter and being able to be able to actually walk through those steps, and I still use somewhat of the framework, but a little different. An example of AI is it costs thousands of dollars to get it right, but there's platforms out there like airai, blandai, and by all means guys, I'm not trying to endorse them, they're ones that I've tried. There are people. If you go onto Fiverr's website, if you're familiar with it, you can actually find people that have the experience and knowledge that are at the fraction of a cost that you would pay somebody to be dedicated, and I found two guys that helped me out.

Speaker 1:

I did most of the heavy lifting. They got me to the finish line, to where I have a prototype that I can start training for less than 200 bucks. They spent probably another six to eight hours, maybe 10 hours, on it to get it to the finish line, to where it sounded more realistic. I probably have about 30 to 40 hours into it at least, but that's how being resourceful and finding ways to get it to work because ultimately at some point. I'm hoping this week that I can launch it out and start testing it on potential cold calls and then start getting that feedback and then I can readjust it. But the thing is, if that's once that starts working, guess what that does? That frees my virtual assistant up to do other things, it frees me up to do from doing cold calling and it allows me to focus on more revenue generating steps that I'm good at. And that's closing deals. Put those meetings on my calendars.

Speaker 2:

I'll close those deals Absolutely when you were talking about the time that you put into it. The way that I learned this and the way that I thought about it was that you have one of two things. You have one of two resources. Either you have time or you have money. Both of them are resources. Now, when you have them, what are you going to do with them? Because if you have time and you're not using that time, that resource, effectively, why should you get the other resource?

Speaker 2:

Again, all reality. Why should you be blessed to have money if you don't even use your time correctly? And at the opposite end, if you have money, if you are one of those listeners who has a ton of money, what are you doing with your time? How are you using your time? So why should you be blessed with more time if you're not even using your money to create more time? Use that time in a positive way. So you only have one of two resources, and how you use those resources creates your resourcefulness, and most individuals don't like hearing that because again it goes counterculture of well, I just need it now. I just need it now.

Speaker 2:

I just need it now.

Speaker 2:

Like no, you don't need it now. You want it now and you believe that if it doesn't come in a specific timeframe then it's not for you. The reality is, the world is going to check you. The universe for me is God. He's going to check me. Do you really want this? I gave you the vision. I showed it to you in your mind. Are you really going to go through all the steps? Because I didn't show you the steps because you would have quit? I showed you the end goal because I know that is what would get your attention. That is what you needed. Sorry, that's what you wanted and that's why I'll give you what you need along the journey.

Speaker 2:

Look at all of the Russell Brunson. Let's use him as an example, right? People don't go watch his old videos where he's standing in a room full of six people making his call to action and, well, stuttering the whole way through it. They want to be the Russell Brunson that's doing the ClickFunnels summit with two, three thousand people in front of him. That's what they want.

Speaker 2:

But the reality is, if you were to get that right now, do you have a offer that you can pitch to them that's actually valuable? Do you have a way to communicate that offer? No, you probably don't, because you haven't been told no. One of the reasons why I can get keynotes now that other people can't get keynotes is because I can effectively communicate the solution that I bring to these organizations. You need interpersonal communication skills built amongst your team, because they haven't had them in the past three years. I'm somebody who has a tool, scientifically based, that can engage your team in a very logical and meaningful way to teach them those interpersonal skills and show them where to use them, and organizations love that. What do you know? But if you just go say hey, like I used to, hey, I'm a disc practitioner, hire me, ain't, nobody cares about that Shut up. So you have to use your resources accordingly in order to be given more resources.

Speaker 1:

I know we've talked about a lot. We're getting close to the end of this, but I wanted to ask two questions. First question is if someone's struggling, they're in that dark space what would be that nugget or two that you would share with them right now that could help them, potentially get them into a better place?

Speaker 2:

One of the nuggets that I would share with somebody who's struggling in that dark place that I used to struggle in is that, if you're given today, then, you do better today than you did yesterday, because if you are willing to put so much effort and energy into getting that substance, getting that fix, getting that drink, you are fix. Getting that drink. You are one of the strongest human beings on this planet. You have a superpower. You just haven't learned how to use it yet and that's why it's killing you. So think about it that way. Don't think about it as, oh, woe is me. You survived a lot, so now use that survival technique to actually thrive in this world. Drug addicts and alcoholics are, for me, the most powerful human beings out there, because you know how to create an emotional connection and you do not let anything stop. So use that superpower, just in a different way.

Speaker 1:

And then, lastly, if someone wants to work with you, how can they get a hold of you? Are you bringing on new clients Right now?

Speaker 2:

I do have a application process. I choose to work with individuals who are actually putting in work themselves. Yes, you can reach out to me at nohalonmcom. That's nohalonmcom Instagram at nohalo. Those are the two best ways to get in contact with me. You can also shoot me an email. It's nico at nohalonmcom. I am pretty choosy on who I work with, mainly because if I'm going to put my name on you, then you got to be about your business and in today's society we don't have that type of a dog inside of a lot of people right now.

Speaker 1:

I will put those links in the show notes for sure to get that out there. Sir, thank you very much for coming on. Love what you're doing. Love your story, but also what you're doing to help others and inspire them to get to the other side, because we all need it today. Thank you, I appreciate you sharing this time with me. You're welcome.

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Seeking Truth and Personal Growth
Consistency and Persistence in Achieving Goals
Finding Strength in Struggle